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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries found in the catalog.

Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries

Matthew Jowett

Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries

a review

by Matthew Jowett

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  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Centre for Health Economics, University of York in York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementMatthew Jowett.
SeriesDiscussion papers -- 181
ContributionsUniversity of York. Centre for Health Economics.
The Physical Object
Pagination26p. :
Number of Pages26
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18455156M

To identify priorities for safe motherhood pro-gramme evaluation in the three countries, we held a series of workshops and consultations with stakehold-ers over a 3 year period (Fig. 1). For our purposes, “safe motherhood stakeholders” included representa-tives from the Ministry of Health and its partners. 8. Diaby V, Lachaine J. An application of a proposed framework for formulary listing in low‐income countries: the case of Cote d'Ivoire. Appl Health Econ Health Policy. Nov 1; 9 (6): – 9. Evans DB. Lim SS. Adam T. Edejer TT. WHO Choosing Interventions that are Cost Effective (CHOICE) Millennium Development Goals Team.

Safe Motherhood As a Vital Social and Economic Investment (WHD ) Making motherhood safe for the world's women calls for national governments, multi-lateral and bilateral agencies and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to make maternal health a top priority and to ensure that the necessary political and financial resources are dedicated to this effort. facility equipped for safe delivery is more than 15 km. 2. The Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) in the country reported that 57% of women in rural areas regarded distance as a barrier to accessing health care when sick. 1. In , Safe Motherhood Action Groups were established. in Zambia as part of a national safe motherhood programme.

  Reducing “the rate of maternal mortality by 75% by ” is one of the development targets that has been endorsed at numerous international meetings.1 This target was selected because maternal ill health is the largest contributor to the disease burden affecting women in developing countries; because the lifetime risk of maternal death is much greater in the poorest countries than .   In this second article of the neonatal survival series, we identify 16 interventions with proven efficacy (implementation under ideal conditions) for neonatal survival and combine them into packages for scaling up in health systems, according to three service delivery modes (outreach, family-community, and facility-based clinical care). All the packages of care are cost effective compared .


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Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries by Matthew Jowett Download PDF EPUB FB2

The economic case for investing in safe motherhood interventions is also examined. It is estimated that 1, women die globally each day as a result of problems during pregnancy or : Matthew Jowett.

This article examines the economic case for investing in safe motherhood interventions, and reviews key evidence of the cost effectiveness of safe motherhood interventions. According to one study, antenatal and maternal services comprise two of the six most cost effective sets of health interventions in low-income by: Downloadable.

This paper reviews studies providing evidence of the cost-effectiveness of safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries. The economic case for investing in safe motherhood interventions is also examined.

It is estimated that 1, women die globally each day as a result of problems during pregnancy or childbirth. A large proportion of these deaths is preventable. This paper reviews studies providing evidence of the cost-effectiveness of safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries.

The economic case for investing in safe motherhood interventions is also examined. It is estimated that 1, women die globally each day as a result of problems during pregnancy or : Matthew Jowett.

Health Policy 53 () – Safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness. Safe Motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness comprise two of the six most cost effective sets of health interventions in.

Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries 3 Introduction The International Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched in Nairobi, Kenya inand provided a focus for programmes and research concerned with the improvement of maternal health in low-income countries. In the following decade.

Jowett M. Safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness. Health Policy. ; 53 (3)– doi: /S(00) Safe motherhood interventions including facility-based delivery are estimated to cost US$ per person in the population, not including the initial investment in new facilities (Bhutta and others ).

The year for the costing is not specified, so these amounts are assumed to be in U.S. dollars. Additional resources should be allocated for safe motherhood, and should be invested in the most cost-effective interventions (in developing countries, basic maternal and newborn care can cost as little as US$3 per person, per year).

Delay Marriage and First Birth. Title(s): Cost-effective safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries: a review/ Matthew Jowett. Country of Publication: England Publisher: [York]: University of York, Centre for Health Economics, [] Description: 26 p.: ill.

The only exception is the single intervention strategy of enhanced safe abortion, which, while not cost-saving, would still be considered highly cost-effective since it has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio that is well below Mexico's GDP per capita of $6, Of note, a combined approach that improves access to safe abortion and.

WHO has developed a simple spreadsheet to assist in estimating the cost of implementing a set of safe motherhood interventions at the district level The model includes a standard set of assumptions representing a hypothetical rural district population.

at home in low-income and middle-income countries against a backdrop of poverty, sub-optimum care seeking, and weak health systems.1–4 Globally, neonatal deaths now account for 38% of deaths in children aged younger than 5 years.2 Child survival and safe motherhood strategies have yet to adequately address mortality in the neonatal period.

In Zambia, as in other low-income countries, maternal health indicators have remained stubbornly resistant to improvement: for example, the presence of skilled birth attendants at deliveries has hardly increased in the past 20 years and the maternal mortality ratio remains over deaths per live births.

1 Two contributing factors have. M. JowettSafe Motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness Health Policy, 53 (3) (), pp.

Google Scholar. Guide policy-makers in prioritizing safe motherhood models (LOW, MED, HIGH) were constructed based on 34 sub-Saharan African count. Safe motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness.

Background. Infant and under-5 childhood mortality rates in developing countries have declined significantly in the past 2 to 3 decades.

However, 2 critical indicators, maternal and newborn mortality, have hardly changed. World leaders at the United Nations Millennium Summit in September agreed on a critical goal to reduce deaths of children. Traditionally, health education interventions at both community and health-facility level have been key elements of most safe motherhood programmes, despite little hard evidence that they are effective in resource-poor settings.

28 To improve preventive and care-seeking behaviours, an increase in knowledge and a change in attitudes is necessary. Reference: Safe Motherhood interventions in low-income countries: an economic justification and evidence of cost effectiveness Incorporating cost and cost - effectiveness into the development of.[Show full abstract] comprise two of the six most cost effective sets of health interventions in low-income countries.

However, little detailed evidence exists regarding the relative cost.According to the most recent data, approximately women die every day from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. This is about one woman every two minutes. For every woman who dies, an estimated 20 or 30 encounter injuries, infections or disabilities.

Most of these deaths and injuries are entirely preventable. Making motherhood safer is a human rights imperative, and it is.